How to make Grid Questions in Google Forms

Google Forms grid question type is excellent for Matching/Selection//Ranking type questions. In this article, we will show you how to use the two kinds of grid questions (Multiple choice and Checkbox) and provide a Form with examples you can start using today.  

To start, add a question to a google form using the plus button and then change the question type to Multiple choice grid.

Adding a question to a Google Form
Selecting the Multiple choice grid type

The question screen shows Rows (Options/Answer) and Columns (Topic/Question) that can be added in any amount.  The example below shows a three-row by four-column grid question.Editor 2

My favorite use of the Grid question type is for matching questions. You can use these at all levels, and it is an easy way to convert traditional worksheets into a digital version.

You can also enable the quiz setting and select answers so students can receive feedback after they submit their responses or have their score automatically added to Google Classroom. I recommend placing the answers/options in the rows and identifiers (Letters or Numbers) in the columns. This helps phone users scroll down rather than use the less convenient slider. Below is a matching question converted to a grid multiple choice question. The link to this example Form is here.

The options I choose for most grid matching questions are require one response per row and limit to one response per column, as shown below.

Selecting options for Multiple Choice Grid type question

I also use the grid question type for selection type questions. The link to a Form with these questions is here. The next example uses a Multiple choice grid question and asks respondents to select an available time slot or indicate they are not available. The Multichoice grid only allows one response per row, and I also require a response in each row.

In the preview mode this question looks like the following:

The format can be changed so TOPIC/QUESTIONS are on the TOP/COLUMN, and OPTIONS/ANSWERS are in the SIDE/ROW.  This is the option I use since it requires less scrolling on smaller screens.  In the example below, I limit responses to one response per column using the three dots ( ⠇) menu but allow multiple responses per row.  Anytime you are allowing multiple responses per ROW, you need to use a Checkbox grid.

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And the preview for this question looks like the following.

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The last version of this question is a checkbox grid with no restriction on the number of responses in ROWS or COLUMNS.

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The last use we show in this article is RANKING questions using the grid question type.  A form with the ranking question is here.  Below the students select their favorite kind of ice cream on a 1 to 5 scale.  

And the preview for this question.

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When choosing between the MC or Checkbox grid type, this table may help.  The quick answer is to use the MC if you want only one response per row and Checkbox to allow multiple responses per row.

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*Option shown at bottom of question:

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Our goal at Sharingtree is to help you share and collaborate with educators from around the world.  If you have a matching, selection or ranking example, use our “Add a collab” feature to share it today.

Use this link for MATCHING forms

Use this link for SELECTION forms

Use this link for RANKING forms

Then just click on “Collabs” or “Add a Collab” to share your version.

Leaf Google Forms Grid Question for SELECTION

We hope you found this article useful and reach out to us with any questions using contact@sharingtree.net

Immediate Feedback during a Google Form using Response Validation

Another method to provide immediate feedback during a Google form is ‘Response validation‘. This feedback only works for short answer questions, and it requires the response to be a specific word(s) or numeric value before going to the next question or section. Megan Kelly has a good article on different ways this feedback option can be used.

Megan Kelly’s article on Response Validation

You access ‘Response validation’ using the vertical three dots (⋮) option. This example shows using a range of values for validation with multiple correct answers based on the graph.

My Google Form template showing this feedback method is here and for additional immediate Feedback option in Google Forms see the blog article titled “Ultimate Guide to Feedback in a Google Form – Part 2“.

Lastly, if you have a complicated response requirement, like multiple words or a phone number, Google allows using a Regular Expression for the response validation. For an example Google form with a regular expression, see this form where Question 2 uses a regular expression to check for multiple correct text responses.

Regular Expression to check for multiple correct text responses

Google Forms is a flexible tool if you understand the different options for questions and feedback. We hope this article helped and check out part 1 of this topic, where we cover providing DELAYED feedback after a Google Form is submitted.

This article is part of a series SharingTree is creating focused on Distance Learning using G Suite. Click here to sign up to receive our weekly email.

Ultimate Guide to FEEDBACK in a Google Form – Part 1

Google Forms has several features that can provide feedback at different times based on responses to questions. This article covers how to provide DELAYED feedback after a form is submitted. We have a matching Group in SharingTree called “How to provide DELAYED Feedback in Google Forms” with all the templates used in this article. If you sign-in and click open, the forms are added to your Google Drive, and you can view and edit them as you progress through this article. 

Some of the WHY questions for using immediate (during) or delayed feedback (after submission) are discussed below by Christy Tucker. This article’s focus is to show HOW to provide DELAYED feedback after a Google Form is submitted. 

From Christy Tucker’s article on Immediate vs Delayed Feedback

Providing feedback after a Google Form is submitted can help a student prepare for a future assessment by reviewing missed questions or improve their current score if they can retake the assessment. We will show three options to allow retakes using the settings (gear icon) options for a form.

Part A: How to allow RETAKES for a Google Form (three options)

General Settings for a Google Form to allow retakes

For all these options you will need to have the option ‘Collect email address‘ in Settings -> General selected so anonymous responses are not allowed.

Option 1 – Select both ‘Limit to 1 Response‘ and ‘Edit after submission

In option 1, you select both ‘Limit to 1 response‘ and ‘Edit after submit‘. When both of these options selected, a form is limited to one attempt that can be edited after submission. When a student completes a form and clicks ‘Submit’, they will see two options. The first option is to ‘View score’, and the second option is to ‘Edit your response’.

The ‘View score‘ button will show which of their responses were correct or incorrect. They can also view any feedback you provide for each question, and we cover how to do this in Part C. The  ‘Edit your response’ link allows them to retry the quiz, and all their previous responses will show and can be changed. Using these settings, an instructor will only see a student’s final score and not any information on their number of attempts. You can view a Group on SharingTree with all the template forms for the options we share in this article here or you can just get the template for option 1 here. Our next method will let you track how many attempts they make.  

Option 2 – Do not select ‘Limit to 1 Response‘ or ‘Edit after submission

For option 2, you do not select either ‘Limit to 1 response‘ or ‘Edit after submit‘. Now when the student submits their form, they will see the ‘View Score‘ and ‘Submit another response‘ options. You can hide the ‘Submit another response‘ option in the Setting -> Quiz options.

View Score only option for Google Form

Using option 2, the instructor can see how many reattempts a student makes and their score for each attempt. The downside is the student must enter all their answers for each attempt. The link to the template form for option 2 is here or to get all the templates see the group for this article.

Option 3 – Select only ‘Limit to 1 Response

A third option is to select only ‘Limit to 1 response’. Now students are in a typical summative assessment format with only one attempt. You can require students to do corrections using the feedback from the ‘View score‘ button, and then you can delete their response from the Response screen on the Google Form, allowing them a manual retake you control.  See the image below and next section for tips on easily finding and deleting responses. The link to the template form for option 3 is here or to get all the templates see the group for this article.

Delete option for student response in Google Form

For option 3, it can be challenging to find the correct student response to delete, but you can open the email select box and use the three dots icon (⋮) with the Find option to search for a particular student’s response to delete.

Search responses to a Form using the Find option

Another option is to use a second identical/similar quiz and provide the student the URL or password for the retake Google Form once you review their corrections. This option avoids the hassle of deleting their response, but it may complicate importing scores if you use the form with Google Classroom. If you want to know more about how to import scores from a Google form to Google Classroom watch this three minute video. In the next part, we will cover HOW to give feedback.

Part B: Setting up your Google Form as a Quiz

In a Google Form to provide feedback, you must set enable the QUIZ option. You can set up a Google Form as a QUIZ by going to the settings (gear icon) and selecting Quizzes.

Enabling Quiz option for a Google Form

Here you can also set what shows when a student submits a form. For a formative assessment where I want to provide feedback and allow retakes, I use the following options.

Example Formative Quiz setting for a Google Form

For a summative assessment where I do not want to provide feedback or retakes, I use these settings.

Example Summative Quiz settings for a Google Form

The rest of this article will focus on the formative type of Google Form quiz and HOW to provide feedback.

Part C: Answers and Feedback on a Google Form Quiz

Now that you have your Google Form set as a Quiz, you can provide an answer for each question and feedback. To add feedback, select a question  and click Answer Key, then Add answer feedback and complete the Add feedback dialog box. You have the option of using text, a URL link, and a video for feedback for incorrect and correct responses.

The feedback you provide is shown when a student selects ‘View score‘ after submitting the form. The video below by Richard Bryne walks you through the process of adding feedback to a question.

How to add answer feedback to quizzes in Google Forms by Richard Byrne

Now is a good time, if you have not already done it, to open the Group in SharingTree called “How to provide DELAYED Feedback in Google Forms” with all the templates used in this article. Google Forms is a flexible tool if you understand the different options for questions and feedback. We hope this article helped and check out part 2 of this topic, where we cover providing immediate feedback during a Google Form

This article is part of a series SharingTree is creating focused on Distance Learning using G Suite. Click here to sign up to receive our weekly email.

Ultimate Guide to Feedback in a Google Form – Part 2

Google Forms has several features that can provide feedback at different times based on responses to questions. This article covers how to provide IMMEDIATE feedback during a form. We have a matching Group in SharingTree called “How to provide IMMEDIATE Feedback in Google Forms” with all the templates used in this article. If you sign-in and click open, the forms are added to your Google Drive, and you can view and edit them as you progress through this article. 

Some of the WHY questions for using immediate (during) or delayed feedback (after submission) are discussed below by Christy Tucker. The focus of this article is to show HOW to provide immediate feedback during a Google Form.

From Christy Tucker’s article on Immediate vs Delayed Feedback

Part 1 – Immediate Feedback during a Google Form

Google Forms provides two ways to provide immediate feedback. These are Branching/Go to section for MC questions or using Response validation for short answer. For a complete list of question types Forms supports see this link from Google.

Two ways to provide immediate feedback during a Google Form

I have sample forms with questions that you can use as a template for each feedback type we discuss. If you click the link all the Google forms and a google sheet with all the article links can be added to your Google Drive by opening the group. Some of the settings required in Forms are not obvious, so having an example can be helpful. In this article, I’ll describe examples for each feedback type and how I use them with my students.

Part 1.1-Branching or Go to Section

One way to use the Branching/Go to Section option is to circle back to the same MC question for incorrect responses and only move forward if the correct answer is selected.

To do this in a Google Form, I place each MC question in one section and then make a second ‘retry’ section with the same question that all incorrect responses go to. In the second retry section, I let them know they missed the question and allow them to reattempt it. This feedback type example requires the student to select the correct response before moving on to the next question. The only difference between this and a standard MC question is using the three dots option to select ‘Go to section based on answer‘. Shuffling the option order is also fine and does not interfere with the branching to the correct location.

Google Form three dots (⋮) option for ‘Go to section based on answer’

The next two images show the original question section and the retry section using the ‘Go to section’ option. Now would be a good time to open the Google form template called ‘Feedback during Google Form using Branching‘ to see this structure.

The original MC question with branching to retry the same question or go to the next question for “correct” response

I name the retry section with the question number and some text to indicate they made an incorrect selection. I then place a duplicate copy of the question in this section, and all incorrect responses go to this one retry section.

Example of retry section for Question #1

I make all the questions ‘Required‘ and you can choose to make the Form a QUIZ and give point values to each question. You can make a correct response to the original question worth a certain point value and a correct retry attempt worth fewer points. Using original and retry point values can help you understand how many attempts students are taking and discourage guessing. I use this question format for lessons and weekly assignments to gauge student completion. Here is the link to the template Google Form using the basic two-section feedback method. Another option is for each incorrect response to go to a different section with specific feedback for that response.

Kasey Bell from Shake Up Learning has a good article on using this branching ability to give specific instruction based on each response and Alice Keeler also discusses this in her article “Fast: Create a Branching Google Form“. This instruction could include a mini-lesson using text, images, or video added to a review/retry section of the form. Only students who responded a certain way would view this section. 

Example of branching flow from Kasey Bell’s article “How to Differentiate Questions with Google Forms”

Part 1.2-Response Validation

Megan Kelly’s article on Response Validation

The second method you can use for immediate feedback during a Google form is ‘Response validation‘. This feedback only works for short answer questions, and it requires the response to be a specific word(s) or numeric value before going to the next question or section. Megan Kelly has a good article on different ways this feedback option can be used.

You access ‘Response validation’ using the vertical three dots (⋮) option. This example shows using a range of values for validation with multiple correct answers based on the graph.

My Google Form template showing this feedback method is here and all the forms and articles are part of the group “Types of Feedback in Google Forms“.

Group with all Forms and Article Links

Lastly, if you have a complicated response requirement, like multiple words or a phone number, Google allows using a Regular Expression for the response validation. For an example Google form with a regular expression, see this form where Question 2 uses a regular expression to check for multiple correct text responses.

Regular Expression to check for multiple correct text responses

Now is a good time, if you have not already done it, to open the Group in SharingTree called “How to provide IMMEDIATE Feedback in Google Forms” with all the templates used in this article. Google Forms is a flexible tool if you understand the different options for questions and feedback. We hope this article helped and check out part 1 of this topic, where we cover providing DELAYED feedback after a Google Form is submitted

This article is part of a series SharingTree is creating focused on Distance Learning using G Suite. Click here to sign up to receive our weekly email.

Using Form Builder to turn a Google Sheet/Doc into a Form

Form Builder helps you to build a Google Form in a fast and straightforward way by importing fields/questions/answers from a Google Doc or Google Sheet. Google Forms are flexible and can include questions, text sections, images, or videos. You can always build a survey or quiz directly in Google Forms, and lots of videos show this process. The additional options I wanted to share are creating a Google Form from a Google Doc or Sheet. 

Part 1: Google Doc to Google Form

If you have a survey or quiz as a Google Doc, you can “import it” to Google Forms using the Form Builder add-on. I’ll show this process using a Google Doc with a student info section followed by four questions. 

Example Google Doc

Next, you navigate to Add-ons from the top toolbar and select ‘Get add-ons‘ or ‘Form Builder for Docs -> Start‘. 

Starting or Get Form Builder Add-on

From here, I made two videos showing the process of Getting the Add-on and using it.

If you want to download and follow along with the videos, I made a group in SharingTree with the Google Doc, Google Form, and video links. Just click “Open” to have everything added to your Google Drive so you can follow along and modify to make your own Google Form from a Google Doc.

Group in SharingTree with Google Doc, Google Form and Links to Videos

Once you click ‘Open‘, a folder is added in your Google Drive with the Google Doc used in the video, the matching Google Form, and a Google Sheet with links to the How-to videos

Files in your Google Drive after ‘Open’

If you have any issues or suggestions, the developers of Form Builder can be reached here and are very responsive. 

Part 2: Google Sheet to Google Form

Using a Google Sheet provides the ability to set many Google Form options like the question type, point value, required options. This ability makes writing questions in Google Sheets much quicker than entering each one in Google Forms directly. I made a Group with templates and videos for this section as well if you want to try them out. We start with the Google Sheet shown below.

Google Sheet Template

When you use a Google Sheet Form Builder uses a feature called ‘Automatic Mapping‘ to identify the type of field/question/answer based on the column heading. The Google Sheet template I used has a number of these options set, and clicking the link above shows you all the possible options. The complete list of question types Form Builder supports is below. 

From Builder for Sheets – Supported Question Types

The magic happens in Form Builder when you check the ‘Range includes header‘ option, and your fields/questions are automatically recognized. I again made two videos showing the process of Getting the Add-on and using it.

Selecting options in Form Builder for Question/Field Import

If you make a Google Form from a Google Doc or Sheet and Form Builder, it would be helpful to share both as a Group in SharingTree so users can easily edit and then submit their version as a Collaboration. Our goal at SharingTree is always to help you share and collaborate with others. Let us know at contact@sharingtree.net if you have any questions or suggestions.

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